What Everyone Wants

What does everyone want?  Everyone wants one thing.  Seriously, everyone is after one thing. So what is it?

Everyone wants to be happy.

Think about it… we want more family, friends, money, time, fun, business, relationships, love, wisdom, etc.  All for what?  So we can “be happy.”  It’s just likeBobby McFerrin sang in 1988 top hit…  “Don’t worry Be Happy.” Ha! Easier said than done.

 

Do we really want green pieces of paper with dicey people on them (money, greenbacks, and cold cash)?  What if we had all that “cold hard cash” and couldn’t spend any of it?  I mean if we had as much as we wanted financially, but we couldn’t travel, buy anything or do anything with it, would we be happy?  I think not. Some say, “If I only had more family and friends then I would really be happy.” Would having more family and friends ultimately mean you would be happy?”

The Dictionary defines happy as “feeling pleased and satisfied.”  How do we find this pleasure and satisfaction called “being happy?”

While writing this, my teenage daughter Camden arrived home from high school.  As I greeted her with a hug, I asked “how was your day?”  Her response was, “I had a great day… in spite of how bad it should have been.” “Why is that?” I asked.  Her response… “Well, I have a ton of homework, I had a pop quiz, it was really busy, and it’s a Monday”.  My response, “well then why in the world are you so happy?”.  Her response, “God”.

I thought, “gosh, can it really be that profound, simple and complex all at the same time?” Maybe… and maybe not.  As a Christian I say “Amen,” and as the father of my daughter I say, “Amen.” However, as I peel away the onion I know lots of Christians that are very unhappy, and lots of non-Christians that seem to be really happy.

So the next question is “Does anything really have any meaning except the meaning we give it?”  After pondering this for almost two decades, my response is a resounding “No!” Nothing in life has any meaning except the meaning we give it.

Being happy is ultimately about how we perceive or interpret everything.

In some countries, death is celebrated. Yet in others, it is considered terrible.

In the midst of bankruptcy, some celebrate, while others contemplate suicide.

Some see victory in divorce, while others are burdened with self-condemnation.

The bottom line is, it comes down to our perceptions, and what it really means to “be happy.”

While working with Tony Robbins, I learned three simple ways to change your perception at any time.

  1. Change your focus. Focus on what you want.  Stop driving forward while looking throughout the rear view mirror.
  2. Change your questions. Ask and you shall receive. Start asking questions that get you more of what you want.  Example: What am I happy about right now?  What can I be happy about in the future?  What makes me happy about the past?
  3. Change your physiology.  Go work out; do pilates, yoga, zumba, etc.  Move your body. Managing a state of mind of “happy” is conditioned over time.  We have to lean into the happy space.

The reason my daughter Camden can maintain a state of mind of peace and happiness in spite of turmoil is her focus centers around God.

What do you focus on?

What questions do you ask yourself?

When’s the last time you worked out?